Darwin Core Maintenance Group

Charter for the Darwin Core Maintenance Group.

Image by Alex Guillaume

Convener

John Wieczorek - VertNet; Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, University of California, Berkeley

Core members

  • Peter Desmet - Research Institute for Nature and Forest (INBO)
  • Markus Döring - Global Biodiversity Information Facility
  • Tim Robertson - Global Biodiversity Information Facility
  • Steven Baskauf - Vanderbilt University Department of Biological Sciences
  • Paula Zermoglio - VertNet

Motivation

This interest group is established to meet the requirements in Section 2.1 of the TDWG Vocabulary Maintenance Specification: to maintain the Darwin Core vocabulary.

Becoming involved

The task group welcomes the participation of individuals who have a vested interest in maintaining the stability and interoperability of Darwin Core. We need people with interest and experience in vocabulary creation, people who are well versed in best practices for metadata documentation, and people with technical data management skills. If you are interested in participating in the group, please contact the convener or a core member.

History/context

The Darwin Core vocabulary has existed in various forms since 1998 and was ratified as a TDWG Standard in 2009. Its terms are widely used in biodiversity metadata transfer and storage. The Darwin Core vocabulary can be used to describe biodiversity resources through fielded text, XML, and RDF. For more information, see Wieczorek et al. 2012. Darwin Core: An Evolving Community-Developed Biodiversity Data Standard https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0029715

Summary

The Darwin Core Maintenance Group is responsible for maintaining the various components of the Darwin Core Standard, which includes managing suggested changes to the vocabulary, providing usage guidelines and examples, and ensuring the preservation and stability of metadata related to components of the standard. Maintenance Group members have a strong interest in ensuring the stability, interoperability, and evolution of the vocabulary.